The power of a vision board

 

vision bd

“Without a vision the people perish” (Proverbs 29:18). I’m not overly religious but this biblical quote sums up the consequences of not having a clear vision of whatever it is you are trying to achieve. We all have goals of some sort either personal and/or professional. It is easy to create a goal – we may mull it over every once in a while, write it down, or discuss with family and friends. However, implementing the goal takes time, effort and persistence.  The implementation phase is usually the part in the goal process that proves the most difficult. 

The key to having your desired goal(s) top of mind is to have it in your face at all times – a constant reminder of what you are working towards – what you are trying to achieve. For those people who are visual learners this task is right up your alley but for those non-visuals it may take some effort to get going but it can be a very effective tool.

So, how do you get started? Here’s a very simple process:

1.       Define your goals. Decide and confirm what they are

2.       Write them down in order of importance and put a timeline beside each one

3.       Find pictures that match each goal – pictures that show where you want to go, what you want to achieve etc.

4.       Get construction paper and organize your pictures with labels in any fashion that appeals to you

5.       Post your board in a frequently visited spot or a place in your home – a place where you have to look at it often, for example attached to the fridge.

The vision board is effective because it serves as a passive motivator to keep working towards your goal — keep saving, keep studying, keep learning, keep exercising etc. This process also trains the mind to believe that you can achieve. It also moves the goal from being a general concept to something real – a tangible.

Many times we sabotage our own success especially with self-doubt and excuses. There are many clichés that serve the purpose of giving ourselves a boost when we get discouraged – “Believe in yourself”; “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again” are two that come to mind. Whatever it takes, the key is to achieve that goal. A daily visual reminder can help keep you motivated and on track to finally crossing that goal off the list. Isn’t that the point?

 

 

 

Why you learn the way you do

 

learning style

We all have our own sense of style – fashion, décor, hairstyles. Our sense of style sets us apart from the masses – makes us unique in our own way. For the avant-garde, the sense of style is even more heightened and dramatic.

When it comes to how we learn, it is no different in terms of our style. Your learning style is the method by which you take in and retain knowledge.  There are many variations of learning styles but for purposes of this blog, I’ll use the acronym VARK – Visual, Auditory, Read/Write, Kinesthetic.

learning styles

 

As Training/Learning and Development Specialists, when we design and deliver programs, we have to appeal to a broad range within our audience base. We need to take the various learning styles into account.

Visual (V): Do you find that you remember information if presented as a graphic e.g. maps, graphs, flow charts? You are a visual learner.

Aural/Auditory (A): Do you have a preference for information that is spoken or heard e.g. podcasts, webchat, lectures? You are an auditory learner.

Read/Write (R): Do you prefer information that is displayed as words e.g. text-based materials, dictionaries? If you prefer reading and writing in all forms, you are a read/write learner.

Kinesthetic (K): Do you have a preference for doing things e.g. demonstrations, simulations, practicing, applications? You are a kinesthetic learner.

Of course, many of us, have multiple intelligences and we do not fall neatly in any one category. Personally, I am a visual and kinesthetic learner – I retain knowledge by pictures and hands on exercises.

What kind of learner are you?