The magic of good instructional design

ID

There’s an app for that! This exclamation is so common these days because there is an app for everything under the sun. Yes, apps certainly make our lives easier – efficient, accessible, handy and so on. However, there are instances when you just have to do the work and rely on your knowledge, skills and abilities the good old fashioned way.

Have you ever attended a training session or a workshop where you were inspired, you felt attuned with the content and most importantly the WIIFM question (what’s in it for me) was answered? I have. It’s a beautiful thing. What you may not have spent the time to consider is: who was responsible for that experience? There is a process that occurs before a facilitator actually delivers the content. There is the needs assessment, the audience and organization analysis, defining the objectives, assembling the content then designing the program.  Yes, there is a model.

Professionals who design training programs are instructional designers. They have the responsibility to align relevant content with objectives in line with the audience and the training need. The designer may be a subject matter expert (SME) or in many cases, not. The marriage of the instructional designer and the SME is a match that must be made in heaven. Although the SME knows the subject inside-out, he/she may not be knowledgeable about adult learning principles and instructional design techniques. Adults do learn differently than children and the design must reflect that.

When designing a program, there are many variables to consider. Let’s start with the different learning styles. There must be elements across the learning styles spectrum embedded into the design to appeal to the wider audience. This makes a difference when you have a room of 20 people but only 3 are engaged. We have visual, auditory, kinesthetic learning styles to name a few.

Designers also need to make the content relatable, consider the four-stage learning cycle and the learning domains when matching activities and content. For example, the learner need to be motivated, need to understand what’s required, need opportunities to practice the concept and then need to apply the new knowledge. Some learners respond to mental stimulation so things like statistics and figures, others respond to emotional stimulation – things that evoke feelings and others to activities that promote doing – manual/physical tasks.

Think of a 500-piece jig saw puzzle that illustrates a captivating picture of the Canadian Rockies. Before you can see and appreciate the picture, you need to assemble all 500 pieces then integrate them correctly piece-by-piece to form the picture. This is the job of an instructional designer.

Instructional designers can make or break a captivating versus a hum drum session. Now, a dynamic facilitator can work wonders in engaging and motivating an audience, even if the design is not up to par. But, that’s a topic for another blog post.

So, the next time you attend a training session and you leave feeling as if you could conquer the world, give two thumbs up to the instructional designer.  Time was well spent to ensure a great design by assembling all the pieces then integrating them precisely into a stunning, stimulating and memorable picture.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s