Is training always necessary?

training

To train or not to train. That is the question. Training programs can be very beneficial in either creating new knowledge and skills for the workforce or improving upon existing knowledge and skills. This in turn can make an organization nimbler and can increase the bottom line.

I have certainly been on the receiving end of training that I would consider a yawn fest. It was delivered poorly, the content was uninteresting and the worst point being that I was forced to go. All these negative emotions translated into being a hostile, captive audience. Very counterproductive.

So, how does a training specialist determine that training is the answer? Two words – needs assessment. The needs assessment determines the problem that needs solving which in turn leads to defining objectives for the program.  Imagine this scenario for a moment: the vice president of sales drops a huge, multi-page, cerlox report on your desk and tells you to create a training program.  You skim quickly and determine that sales are down and there is an absenteeism problem with the sales representatives. What’s next? Do you obey the powers that be and hastily draft a training program? After all, there is a problem that needs to be solved. Right?

But, there could be a myriad of reasons for the drop in sales and the absentee sales reps. The training specialist needs to get to the core of those reasons. The right antidote is needed to cure the specific ailment. When I have a headache, I certainly don’t put heavy metal music on blast. I take an aspirin and find a quiet place to recover. The right remedy for the specific problem.

Let’s go back to the scenario. As the training specialist, you conduct a survey with specific questions, conduct some focus group sessions to gain some insight and then you conduct some interviews to gather even more information.  Based on this analysis, you discover that the drop in sales and absenteeism is a result of poor morale rather than poor knowledge and skills. Instead of a training program, you recommend some engagement activities over a period of time. Sales and attendance improve gradually.

Training does not solve every issue in the workplace. Conducting a thorough needs analysis will provide insight into what plan to take to solve the problem. In the scenario: unnecessary time, effort, manpower and costs were averted because the time was taken to assess the situation and apply the right remedy to the problem. Needs assessment is key.

Is orientation a waste of time?

 

orientation

 

Picture this. It is the first day of your new job. You are all excited to get started and showcase your talents. You arrive at work bright and early and check in at the security desk as a new employee. The security guard prevents you from entering without an access card. You wait and wait but no one comes to greet you for at least one hour. Then you arrive at your desk only to discover that your manager is on vacation and there is no direction on what to do. This was my experience a few years ago on day one of my new job at a media company. I languished alone in the atrium of this building – a cavernous structure – watching people come and go. No one was prepared for my arrival, there was no one to greet me and show me around and worst of all, no orientation program which would have solved the first-day angst experienced by most new employees.

Needless to say, I could have walked out and not look back. Reason prevailed. I persevered and ended up working for this organization for five years. That whole experience tainted my view of the organization but created a development opportunity for me.  I saw an area that was lacking and made gains in introducing improvements. Also, I was able to calm the nagging voice in my head that kept telling me that a career in training and development was my next move.

Fast forward seven years later. I am now working at a financial services company that values being the employer of choice. It provides training and career development plus numerous learning opportunities. I was very pleased to have a two-hour orientation session on day one. This session gave me the tools and knowledge to navigate the campus, the corporate systems, get an overview of the strategy and structure and to know who to call for what and when. Armed with these nuggets of information, I felt I could just jump right in and start making my contribution to the company without wasting time. Now, orientation did not cover every little thing. I still had to do some research into my specific area –   for example, discovering my team; getting acquainted with the content etc.

Some people may argue that orientation is a waste of time. As you can tell, I disagree. If done right, it is a very useful and effective way to begin tenure at any organization. After all, the intent of a company is to retain its talent. The journey does not stop at receiving an offer letter – the audition process continues well after the three or six-month probationary period.

So yes, the orientation session is not only an effective tool for the company but also for employees. Use it to start the relationship off on the right track.

Empower yourself

“Knowledge is power”. Now I don’t know exactly who first coined this famous quote. There are varying opinions from Sir Francis Bacon in the 1500’s to Thomas Jefferson, but one thing is certain, it is a true statement.

I have utilized this quote both in my personal and professional life. In my personal sphere, I use the 5 W’s – who, what, where, why, when and for extra good measure – how. I am conscious about who I share my personal information with, what kinds of information I share, where I am when I’m sharing, why I am sharing, when do I choose to share and how I do the sharing. Remember, knowledge is power.

In my professional sphere, I am always looking for opportunities to learn and grow and I encourage others to do the same. I am so passionate about training and learning that I pursued training and development as a career choice. It is a fulfilling experience when you can impart knowledge and witness the transformation. In the corporate world, I use training and learning as an empowerment strategy. The more you know, the more training you have, the more knowledge and experience you have – the more control you have over your path which leads to being empowered.

empower

 

In this age of social media, it seems prolific sharing and oversharing of our personal lives has become the norm. But, I believe on that front, there is such a thing as too much information (TMI). However, when it comes to professional development, you can never have enough knowledge.

I was introduced to Daniel Pink’s book, Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us. In the book, Daniel outlines the three elements of true motivation – autonomy, mastery and purpose. I will take this concept a step further and say that when you have autonomy over your path, when you can master your work and when you have a set course of action – a purpose – then the overarching behaviour is empowerment.

How does one have autonomy, mastery and purpose? First you need to be motivated to pursue new ideas, new concepts and different ways of thinking and doing.  There is no reward without work. One sure way to take control and ownership of your development is to increase your knowledge, skills and abilities. Remember, knowledge is power.